The Best 65+ Michigan Degree Programs, Colleges and Nursing Schools

Top Michigan Nursing Schools, Colleges & Degree Programs

The nursing shortage situation in Michigan is bleak. At present, the situation is really bad and it is only set to get worse. Some 70% of the current workforce are over the age of 45, which means that the demand will grow exponentially each year as more and more nurses retire. Indeed, the growth rate in Michigan appears to be higher than the 19% predicted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics by 2020.

The highest demand for nurses is in access to primary care. Only 39% of those with an advanced practice nurse registration currently work in primary care. Even fewer – just 9% – work specifically in women’s health.

In 2008, the workforce of registered nurses was surveyed and 39% said that they would stop their work within 10 years. This means that, by 2018, there will be a shortage of 5,296 registered nurses if current trends continue.

There is also a highly significant demand for nurse educators, with the average age of educators being 52. Indeed, over half of all nurse educators in Michigan could retire today if they so choose. Because of the fact that there are insufficient school and insufficient staff members, 4,298 prospective students had to be turned away in the 2005-2006 academic year.

There are 502 areas in Michigan that have been classified as health professional shortage areas. These include 224 primary care areas. As a result, some 490 extra providers are needed right now to address this specific need. Indeed, 63.63% of the population currently live in these areas.

The economy in the state is improving and a direct result of this is an increase in demand for nursing staff. The population is aging and growing, which means more primary care services are needed.

There is great variation in terms of where the shortages are the worst. Some hospitals seem to be more affected than others. Considering that registered nurses contribute $15 billion to the economy of Michigan, it is clear that something needs to be done. The average salary of a registered nurse in Michigan is $65,000, which is at par with the national average. However, there are great variations depending on geographical location and on the level of education of the nurse. Indeed, the highest educated nurses – those with a master’s degree in particular – are the best paid. Michigan is also trying to make sure the vast majority of its nursing workforce will be educated to at least the bachelor’s degree level.

List of Michigan Nursing Schools & Colleges

Sponsored School

Capella University Online Nursing Programs

Capella University offers CCNE-accredited online nursing programs designed to meet the needs of RNs at every career stage:

 

Start a Conversation