mini logo

Nursing Jobs You Can Do From Home

mini logo

Technological advances in telehealth continue to make remote healthcare more accessible and effective for patient care. Computers and mobile devices allow patients to conveniently schedule visits and to communicate with their healthcare practitioners without commuting to a specific location. As increasing numbers of patients have access to and use these technologies, work-from-home nursing jobs become more common.

Nurses have been and remain in demand, and many nursing professionals earn high salaries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), projected job growth rates from 2019-29 total 7% for registered nurses (RNs), 9% for licensed practical nurses, and 45% for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

The continued field growth could indicate an increase in online nursing jobs and in-person positions. Moreover, in this year of additional stress and burnout among nurses who risk contracting coronavirus, telehealth provides a safe and efficient way for them to work many roles.

Popular Nursing Jobs You Can Do From Home

  • 1. Telephone Triage Nurse

    According to Lina Velikova, MD, Ph.D., “Telephone triage is becoming more prominent since it allows doctors to manage their time better and tend to patients with more severe conditions, while nurses assess symptoms and advise patients over the phone.”

    Telephone triage nurses recommend whether a patient should go to the emergency room or urgent care immediately, or they may suggest that the patient schedule an appointment to see their physician. They typically earn between $29,000-$74,000, according to PayScale.

  • 2. Nurse Case Manager

    Case management involves communication with patients, care providers, and insurance companies regarding services needed and coverage eligibility. They may also communicate with employers for work-related injuries and conditions.

    “Case management can turn into a lucrative career path for nurses who desire to work remotely,” Velikova says.

    Case managers can expect to earn an average salary of $72,740.

  • 3. Insurance Claims

    Nurses working in this field may work for hospitals or for insurance companies. Like case managers, they check patients’ insurance policies for coverage of the required services, but they also recommend care adjustments to clinical review boards.

    Insurance claims nurses usually have an RN license and a background in clinical nursing and administrative work. Their salaries average $70,972.

    “Professional nurses are the best people for this position since they can make more accurate decisions that work in everyone’s best interest,” offers Velikova.

  • 4. Legal Nurse Consultant

    These specialists assist attorneys working on medical cases. While the job does not require formal legal training, nurses need skills in medical chronology and case analysis. Some universities offer a master of science in nursing (MSN) with a concentration in legal nurse consulting.

    Kealy Hawk, RN, says, “They primarily work from home and can assist lawyers in a variety of ways because of their medical training. They can consult with lawyers over the phone or internet.”

    Legal nurse consultants make an average salary of $78,258.

  • 5. Freelance Nurse Writer

    “Nurses who have a passion for writing can pursue careers as medical writers and work from anywhere in the world,” suggests Velikova. Freelance nurse writers need “extensive knowledge of medical terminology and procedures,” she adds.

    Medical writers also need the versatility and skills to write for various audiences, as they may write for healthcare professionals and also for patients. Freelance writers earn an annual average salary of $40,268, while medical writers average $72,195.

  • 6. Nursing Informatics

    These work-from-home RN jobs require a background in clinical nursing and experience with electronic health records. These nurses maintain medical software and hardware, train medical staff to use patient care applications, and perform system updates and troubleshooting. The job also requires a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), but many employers prefer a master’s in health informatics, healthcare management, or quality management.

    Nursing informatics jobs typically pay an average salary of $78,772.

How to Work from Home as a Nurse

Most online nursing jobs require an RN license. The paths to obtaining an RN license include graduating with a one- to two-year associate degree in nursing or a four-year BSN.

Depending on the specialization or expertise required for the job, RNs without BSNs can earn them through one- to two-year accelerated programs, or they can pursue a master’s degree in nursing informatics or legal nurse consulting, for example, which takes about three years. In addition, an MSN prepares graduates for specialty certification and licensure as an APRN, which can significantly increase earning power and employment opportunities in many positions.

Nursing schools offer online programs at all degree levels that can prepare work-from-home nurses.

Meet Our Contributors

Kealy Hawk

Kealy Hawk
Kealy is a registered nurse, lactation counselor, and most importantly a mommy! It’s her passion to help moms and babies love their breastfeeding journey by meeting them where they’re at with the support they need. Find her at www.littlebearcare.com where she offers virtual consultations and online classes.


  • Lina Velikova
    Dr. Lina Velikova, MD, Ph.D., is a medical advisor at Supplements101.

Advertisement NurseJournal.org is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

Are you ready to earn your online nursing degree?

Whether you’re looking to get your pre-licensure degree or taking the next step in your career, the education you need could be more affordable than you think. Find the right nursing program for you.